Thursday, 31 March 2016

Photos Scavenger Hunt








This is one project I really enjoy doing, I don't need much encouragement to get out there with my camera.
 The list of word helps to look for things I might not have photographed.
Have a look over at Greenthumb and see what other people have snapped.  

Thanks to Greenthumb of Made with Love for organising the hunt.









Local




Top of Yeadon West Yorkshire looking over 



towards the Chevin above Otley.




City



Leeds

(Taken by my son)



Stripes





Fields at Eccup.




Crisp







Leaf skeleton.

Ice trapped in the cell's of the leaf.




Street art







Graffiti on a wall 



Tiles





Shop front.

Butchers on Yeadon high street. 




Rocks Stairs








Not quite stairs

Stone stepping stones across the river 

Wharfe.

(West Yorkshire)




Hair







Hair...has to be

 Horse hair caught on barbed wire.  



Measure





Tape measure.

Belonging to my Nana, found in her old sewing

box.




Large





Large amounts of snails found under garden

 tubs.



For one





A spider web.

Unless you live in Texas.




Landscape



This is what we see, looking over to the 
hills at Settle, North Yorkshire.

Every Easter weekend we try to get together

and go egg rolling (decorated boiled eggs).

Had taken place in snow rain and sunshine.




Walking through the village at Giggleswick. 





Tuesday, 22 March 2016

On this day in March 2016

Park


White Crocuses 





Leaf  skeleton


Robin, Wood pigeon,
Queen bee, Larch flower

Yeadon Tarn



Black-headed gull, Common gull


Common reed bunting

Lichen and Moss

Canada geese, Willow catkins , Black-headed gull, Male and female pheasant,
Colt's-foot flower



Burley roundabout



Sleeping lamb




Dog's Mercury (plant),
 lesser celandine (plant)
Brown-lipped Snail, Cowslip (plant)



Blackthorn blossom, Hazel catkins

Curlew

Hope you have enjoyed a photo trip round the places I like to visit.


Thursday, 17 March 2016

A week of *FIRST'S* and a trip to Denso Marston Nature Reserve




I have been out and about a lot this week, plenty to show.


I saw my first Bat of the year out feeding on Friday night, so dusted the moth trap and put that out for the first time this year.

Two new moths for me.



Hebrew Character




Common Quaker
**************************************
Monday was a trip to Eccup.
On the way stopped of at the Chevin and saw my First Snipe.
Roe Deer
Redshank
Wigeon









Then on Wednesday I went to a place I have visited before a few years back but not blogged about.


(link)
The seven acre reserve is situated between the River Aire and the Denso Marston factory in Shipley, West Yorkshire.
Created in 1990 on Denso Marston washland for the benefit of wildlife, community enjoyment and education.
An urban haven of woodland, meadows and pools with varied wildlife complement the other green areas in the wildlife rich Aire valley.

Throughout the year we organise a variety of events including guided walks, work parties and group activities. 
From Wildlife walks to Creative Writing, but it was the mention of Adult Education session that caught my eye.

At first you would not believe there was anything in the area to see, and the entrance doesn't jump out at you nestled between large industrial  sites.





The very first thing that hits you is all the rubbish still left in all the trees and in the river from the winter floods, this area was hit very badly.




 

If you go on Twitter and put in 
Denso Marston Nature, you can see how bad it was after the flood.




Mink
Birds seen today
Wren, Dunnock, Blue tit, Great tit, Long-tailed tit, Goosanders, (2) Goldcrest, Robin, Mallard, Blackbird.

I have met and talked with the warden, Steve before. To day was no different his enthusiasm and passion for this place and nature overall is very inspiring.

After a long chat with Steve and Harry Allenby (Flower man) I had signed up for a session on windflowers in April.
The best part of the morning was been told about the frog spawn in the pond.





It won't be long before I am back to visit..





  

Monday, 7 March 2016

Now if I could only remember what it was called !




Over the winter months you get out of the habit of looking at insects,flowers etc, soon forgetting what you have learned over the summer months.
Moving into Spring hopefully as nature wakes up there will be plenty of old and new things to discover.

Ideas often come to me as my head hits the pillow for the night, my great plan was to look under stones and logs. If the weather was fine, and see what I could find. Reacquaint my self with the natural world (creepy-crawlies)

   

Under the first stone was a Harvestman .

With a round, compact body and extremely long legs.

Although it looks like a long-legged spider, it isn't one. It is one of the Opilones, a group of arachnids closely related to spiders. Unlike the spiders, it has no silk glands so is not able to spin a web. It does not have fangs and does not produce venom.

It catches its insect prey by using hooks on the ends of its legs. These arachnids defend themselves by secreting a foul-smelling fluid. If they are caught, they are able to shed a leg to escape.(link)





Woodlouse were easy to find amongst the logs in the bug hotel.

Common Shiny Woodlouse 
Common rough woodlouse

Woodlice (order Isopoda: suborder Oniscidea) are amongst the most accessible groups of animals to study. However, our present knowledge of the status and distribution of woodlice within Britain remains patchy. Of the 40 species found outdoors in Britain, Common Pygmy Woodlouse Trichoniscus pusillus, Smooth Woodlouse Oniscus asellus and Rough Woodlouse Porcellio scaber, are common just about everywhere. A fourth species Philoscia muscorum is rare in northern Scotland, while a fifth species, the pill-bug Armadillidium vulgare, is only common in the south and east.
If you are interested in these things you must take a look at this (link)
Need to work out if I have Pygmy Woodlouse, as I thought the small ones I saw were just babies 







Many Snail shells, some empty and some full.
During the winter garden snails hibernate, often in large groups, under stones and in crevices of trees.  They seal themselves into their shells with a layer of mucus which hardens to form a cap.




There are more than 30 different species of slug in the UK, and I am just as bad at trying to I.D these too.


Think these are Grey Field Slugs.













Later in the day a quick trip to the park.
The Squirrels here don't often stay still long enough for a photo, today this chap did.




The next time I moan about not been able to go to some fancy reserve, I need to remember it's all happening in my back yard, lot's to learn and discover.